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Showing posts from September, 2009

Telephone and Fax Services Security

In this day of doing everything online, we still rely heavily on services delivered over POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service). Banks and credit card companies still require the telephone to make certain changes, queries and security checks, even though most functions can be performed online. Medical records, bank details, security key order requests, etc., are routinely transferred by facsimile. However, are these secure? Are they more or less secure than doing the same thing online?

I'm not going to talk about the underlying security of POTS, but concentrate on a couple of easy attack vectors on the end device of the user that I have recently observed. A couple of weeks ago, I needed to amend something on one of my credit card accounts (I would tell you which bank, only it's my personal credit card and I don't want phisers knowing which banks I have accounts with). This bank has an automated telephone answering system to make things more efficient and reduce staff required …

Human Factors in Information Security - Errors & Violations

Human failures are often described as Slips, Lapses, Mistakes and Violations. These are grouped into two categories: Errors and Violations. The difference here is the intent - violations result from conscious decisions to disregard policies and procedures, whereas errors have no malicious intent. Also, violations often involve more than one form of misconduct, whereas errors are often isolated.

Don Turnblade has stated that in his experience "well trained staff had a 3.75% unintentional non-compliance rate; they did not realize that installed software compromised data security. About 0.4% of end users were intentionally non-compliant, generally willful persons with strong technical skill or organizational authority who were unaccustomed to complying with computing restrictions."

So what are the different types of error? Dealing with each in turn, we have Slips, Lapses and Mistakes.
Slips - actions not carried out as intended, e.g. pressing the wrong key by accident. Slips usua…

Personal Mobile Devices Violate Compliance

Computer Weekly recently conducted a survey via Twitter on how many organisations allow their users access to corporate email from their own private phone. Unfortunately, I haven't seen any results from this survey as yet, but it made me think about organisations that do allow private devices to attach to the network, not just mobile phones. I have also had many comments on my blog post entitled 'Mobile Device Data Breaches', which have fed into this post.

In one of those comments, someone pointed out that in their experience users are often a weak link. Isn’t it always the case that users are the weakest link? A poorly educated/trained user can compromise the best security. Unfortunately, I have seen so many organisations that do not adequately train their users or make them aware that there are policies, let alone what they mean to their daily usage of the corporate systems. I have also come across one organisation where a top executive had all the system passwords store…

Compliance does NOT Equal Security

Comodo Vision Video Blog
Responsibility for the notorious Heartland Payment Systems data breach late last year has been debated recently, with Heartland’s CEO suggesting that their PCI auditors let the firm down, while the auditors insist they can’t be responsible for checking absolutely everything. This case brings to light the reality that absolute security is an impossible goal, and that audits are only as good as an organization’s vigilance in following proper security procedures after the audit has been completed.
See my second video blog here.

Mobile Device Data Breaches

Comodo Vision Video Blog
Several recent data breaches at major enterprises and governmental agencies stemmed from the loss or theft of mobile computers and USB drives. While encrypting the data on these devices isn’t a bad idea, the larger question is why was sensitive personal information stored on the mobile device in the first place?
See my first video blog for Comodo Vision here.