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3M Privacy Filters Update

I have blogged about 3M's privacy filters before and their gold filter still remains, in my opinion, the best privacy filter on the market. If you want to find out more about that one and why you need a privacy filter, see my previous blog post "Why do I need a privacy filter? (3M's new Vikuiti Gold Privacy Filter)". I also blogged about their mobile phone privacy filter.

The problem with their mobile phone privacy filter last year was that it was only available in their standard grey louvered filter, so didn't work well with accelerometer phones that can be used in portrait or landscape modes - you had to pre-select which orientation you wanted to use your smartphone in. Also, the light transmission wasn't as good as the gold filter nor was the touch quite as good after applying it.

Well, they've addressed this and lanuched a new filter for mobile phones and slates at InfoSecurity Europe. The filter is now significantly thinner with excellent touch response and better light transmission - they also have a clarity measure which makes the screen easier to read with the filter (it does kind of work, having seen an iPad with only half the screen covered). They also have (in the lab) a grey louvered filter in two planes. This stops people from being able to read the screen if they aren't directly in front of it and deals with mobile phones and slate devices that can be used in the two orientations. This filter isn't available yet, but 3M told me that they were targeting the end of this year for these new filters. 3M also assured me that the new filter with double-louvers will be no thicker than the current one. This, combined with 3M's great adhesive that allows for a simple application, will make 3M's new privacy filters for mobile phones and slates the one to have, especially as they double as screen protectors.

Unfortunately they only do pre-cut versions for iPhones, iPads and HTC phones at the moment. If you don't have one of these then you will have to either cut it yourself or get a third party to cut one for you.

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