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EU Commission Working Group looking at privacy concerns in IoT

The Article 29 Working Group advising the EU Commission on Data Protection has published their opinion on the security and privacy concerns of the Internet of Things. A couple of interesting quotes come from this document and it points to possible future laws and regulations.
"Many questions arise around the vulnerability of these devices, often deployed outside a traditional IT structure and lacking sufficient security built into them."
"...users must remain in complete control of their personal data throughout the product lifecycle, and when organisations rely on consent as a basis for processing, the consent should be fully informed, freely given and specific."
One thing is for sure, privacy is likely to get eroded further with the widespread adoption of IoT devices and wearables. It is critical that these devices, and the services provided with them, have security built in from the start.

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