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Mobile Device Data Breaches

Comodo Vision Video Blog
Several recent data breaches at major enterprises and governmental agencies stemmed from the loss or theft of mobile computers and USB drives. While encrypting the data on these devices isn’t a bad idea, the larger question is why was sensitive personal information stored on the mobile device in the first place?
See my first video blog for Comodo Vision here.

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