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Series of Demo Videos of Trusteer's Rapport

I am currently producing a series of videos demonstrating the anti-spyware capabilities of Trusteer's Rapport. So far I have looked at keylogging software and screen capture. Specifically, I have demonstrated it with Zemana ScreenLogger, Zemana KeyLogger and SpyShelter. I will be adding more videos over the next few days. The first two videos are embedded below. (Edit: 17/05/10 - I have now added three more videos covering Zemana SSL Logger, AKLT and Snadboy's Revelation V2.)





Links to the YouTube videos are below:

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